Jan. 10th Weekly Newsletter

Nevada Farm Bureau Newsletter For Jan. 10, 2019

 

White Pine County Farm Bureau January 23 Meeting To Feature Shane Krauser

The White Pine County Farm Bureau will hold their annual meeting in Ely, NV on Wednesday, January 23, starting at 6 p.m. The meeting will feature as a special guest speaker, Shane Krauser, who is the director of the American Academy for Constitutional Education.

Krauser is also a former nationally-syndicated radio talk show host, an adjunct professor of constitutional law, an NRA firearms instructor, and an experienced trial attorney. He is an entrepreneur who is involved in a number of ventures that are designed to bring about more economic, political, and spiritual liberty. He is the author of “Your Nation to Save” and “What is Freedom? Is It For you?” and is a widely sought-after speaker throughout the United States.

The White Pine County annual meeting will be held in the Prospector Hotel, Ely and Margarita’s will be serving the meal. Guest and members are invited to bring their favorite desert to be included in the auction that will take place during the meeting activities with the proceeds from the auction going to fund portions of the White Pine County Farm Bureau scholarship program.

RSVP follow-up is encouraged with contacts welcome by emailing Gracyne Backus at gracynebackus@msn.com.

 

Farm Bureau Members – Your Opportunity For Input On Clean Water Regulations

Farm Bureau is actively promoting the input of Farm Bureau members for the newest rewrite of federal water regulations. This opportunity is easy to use, simply Click Here to connect with the American Farm Bureau Federation’s advocacy system which allows for an easy to use platform for giving your input.

Arizona Farm Bureau President Stefanie Smallhouse recently had her thoughts published regarding the newly proposed federal water regulations. These thoughts might also be of assistance to you in formulating ideas for building your comments…

 

American Farm Bureau Federation Offers Report On Accomplishments Of 2018

Looking back at the progress and achievements of the just concluded year, the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) has prepared this on-line booklet of 15 pages of accomplishments. As this booklet is being reviewed and considered, it is important that the steps for getting these things done included engaged Farm Bureau members who sent emails to their elected representatives…made phone calls or had personal face-to-face meetings. Farm Bureau’s work is carried out through activated volunteers as well as professional staff members. Whether it is work that needs to be carried out in Washington, D.C. – Carson City – or in your local community…we hope that you’ll be busy this coming year in making things happen and sounding off for things that need to be kept from happening…

 

 

Updated Contact Information For Nevada’s Congressional Delegation

Last week’s newsletter included the information that we had available for connections with those who represent Nevada in Washington, D.C. This list is the most current and updated contact information: (We’re also including the home pages for those we have information for…these sites frequently provide the most direct system for contacting the member of Congress.)

U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

204 Russell Senate Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

202-224-3542

https://www.cortezmasto.senate.gov/

U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen

G12 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

202-224-6244

https://www.senate.gov/senators/116thCongress/RosenJacky.htm

U.S. Congresswoman Dina Titus – District 1

2464 Rayburn Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-5965

https://titus.house.gov/

U.S. Congressman Mark Amodei – District 2

332 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-6155

https://amodei.house.gov/

U.S. Congresswoman Susie Lee – District 3

413 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-3252

https://susielee.house.gov/

U.S. Congressman Steve Horsford – District 4

313 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-9894

https://horsford.house.gov/

 

Nevada Legislative Actions Around The Corner

As a preliminary to the 2019 Nevada Legislature, which begins on February 4, the Legislative Commission’s Budget Subcommittee will begin the work of grinding through Nevada budget on Tuesday, January 22 in Carson City.

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak, who was sworn in as the state’s 30 Governor on January 7, will deliver his “State of the State Address” from the Nevada Assembly Chambers at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, January 16.

 

 

 

Farm Bureau Annual Meetings – Setting The Course For Organizational Actions

As this week’s newsletter is being distributed, 25 Nevada Farm Bureau members and leaders are traveling to New Orleans to participate in the 2019 – Centennial – American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) annual meeting. The first such AFBF annual meeting that was held, November 12 and 13, 1919 in the Red Room of the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago didn’t have any delegates representing Nevada Farm Bureau – as was reported last week, Nevada didn’t join the

AFBF until 1920. This year the Nevada Farm Bureau will have two delegates participating in the voting delegate body and finalizing the organization’s policy for the coming year.

In December of 1920, AFBF held their meeting in Indianapolis and according to author O.M. Kile in his account “The Farm Bureau Through Three Decades”…

“A comprehensive program of work was adopted by the delegates. It was a rather remarkable document of thirty paragraphs and covered most of the legislative, economic and organizational subjects that would come to the fore in the following two or three years.”

Over the past 100 years, the AFBF Policy Book has grown, along with the range of the areas for organizational involvement. On the other hand, the policy is still set by farmers and ranchers and is based on a national representation of all geographic areas and commodity types.

On January 3, 2019, the Elko County Farm Bureau held their annual meeting at the Williams Gun Museum and about 40 members participated in the evening’s activities.

One of the earliest records of county Farm Bureau annual meetings we have at the Sparks Farm Bureau office is from Elko County. This set of meeting minutes is dated November 11, 1921 and was called to order by President E.C. Riddell. That year’s annual meeting in Elko county was a two-day event. Their 21 county Farm Bureau voting delegates conducted the business on the second day. The delegates were representatives of the various community centers from around the county (Ruby Valley, Lamoille, Lee, North Fork, Star Valley, Tuscarora, Midas, Metropolis and Elko).

The issues of the day, based on the accounts of the 1921 Elko County Farm Bureau meeting minutes included rodent poisoning and efforts to improve the quality of dairy stock. Eradication of Tuberculosis was another topic of priority. There was also attention given to the idea of “securing a better breed of swine.”

Based on some coordination of accounts from records of County Farm Bureau Board minutes, Nevada State Farm Bureau, held their first official annual meeting in Reno in 1922.

The earliest records (Nevada Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Minutes) that have surfaced so far go back to January 25 - 29, 1926 – the “Seventh Annual Meeting,” held at the Court House in Las Vegas, NV…

J.D. Yeager of Lyon County was President of the Nevada State Farm Bureau, who presided at the 1926 Annual Meeting. Yeager served as the State Farm Bureau President from 1925 to 1934.

Over the course of their 1926 Annual Meeting, Farm Bureau members had the opportunity to hear from Nevada Governor James Scrugham, who according to the meeting minutes for Thursday, January 29, 1926 “gave assurance that Nevada is on a very sound financial basis.” The meeting minutes continue with notes that the Governor’s speech also covered the “good roads that have been established all over the state and of the good schools.” He also discussed the “range problem and the water situation.”

 

Are You Looking To Connect With Someone To Shoot Your Ground Squirrels?

Nevada Farm Bureau has been contacted by someone who has been shooting squirrels and is looking for connections to shoot yours. His name is Wes Price and he can be reached by email at price.wes1@gmail.com or by phone at (530) 742-8307. He is connected to a small group of “old guys that love to shoot those pesky critters.” This group is dedicated to safety and respect of property. Contact Wes to make whatever your desired arrangements might be.

 

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NDA and DFI team up for FSMA produce safety rule trainings in January

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule (PSR) compliance dates are quickly approaching for farms that grow fruits and vegetables commonly consumed raw. Large farms will be required to undergo initial compliance inspections during the 2019 growing season. To address industry training needs and provide resources that will assist growers and packers with achieving compliance, the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) is partnering with the University of Nevada, Reno’s Desert Farming Initiative (DFI). Multiple training workshops are scheduled throughout the state during the month of January:

  • 11, 2019 in Las Vegas
  • 16, 2019 in Elko
  • 29, 2019 in Sparks
  • 16, 2019 in Sparks (Nevada Farms Conference session)

These new regulations were created by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the intent to prevent contamination on farms and packing facilities, as opposed to reacting to an outbreak. The overall goal of the FSMA is to establish a more secure food system, including the domestic food chain, imports and exports, as they are all required to comply with these regulations. 

The FDA has collaborated with the Produce Safety Alliance (PSA) in establishing education curriculum for producers that will need to comply with the regulations. Attending a PSA training is the first step toward meeting compliance. The NDA is an approved provider of this curriculum and will be hosting a training at the NDA headquarters in Sparks in conjunction with DFI on Jan. 29, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Topics will include:

  • federal regulations,
  • worker health and hygiene,
  • water testing,
  • soil amendments,
  • animal intrusion and
  • resources available.

 

The NDA is also partnering with DFI to provide education, technical training and one-on-one assistance to help producers implement produce safety programs. Small farms with limited distribution are exempt from these regulations, however we still encourage attendance so all farms can adopt best practices for minimizing microbial contamination when growing and handling produce, thus minimizing risk of foodborne illness. A condensed training on produce safety practices, geared at exempt growers will be provided at the Las Vegas NDA office on Jan. 11, 2019 from 9 a.m. to noon, and at the Elko NDA office on Jan. 16, 2019 from 1 to 4 p.m.

 

Who is impacted by the FSMA PSR?

These new regulations will impact produce farms and packing houses of a designated size (producesales more than $26,999 on average over a three year period with distribution more than 275 miles from the facility or outside the state; or allfarm sales more than $500,000 with product distribution outside the state or more than 275 miles from the farm) that handle crops commonly consumed raw such as leafy greens, melons, microgreens and tomatoes. 

Training workshop details

  • Full FSMA PSR Workshop
    29, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (geared for operations required to comply, but open to all)
    405 South 21stStreet in Sparks
  • Condensed Food Safety Workshop(geared for exempt growers, but open to all)
    11, 2019 from 9 a.m. to noon
    2300 East St. Louis Street in Las Vegas
  • Condensed Food Safety Workshop(geared for exempt growers, but open to all)
    16, 2019 from 1 to 4 p.m.
    4780 East Idaho Street in Elko
  • Condensed Food Safety Session (open to registrants of the Nevada Farms Conference)

Feb. 16, 2019 Nevada Farms Conference(time TBD)

Atlantis Casino Resort Spa in Reno

More information about FSMA PSR

agri.nv.gov/FSMA
Adriana Marin-Herrera, NDA

amarin-herrera@agri.nv.gov

775-353-3696

producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/training

fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/fsma

More information about developing a farm food safety program

Jill Moe, DFI

jmoe@cabnr.unr.edu 

775-6829782

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Jan. 4, 2019 Grassroots Newsletter

Jan. 4, 2019 Grassroots Newsletter

Farm Bureau Members Need To Be Heard In Setting Workable Definition For Federal Authority On Water

With the recent release of the newly proposed, covering the authority for what waters the federal government regulations should be applied to, Farm Bureau is seeking the help of Farm Bureau members to weigh in with comments during the public input process. Using the organization’s advocacy platform, Farm Bureau members can participate with submitting comments.Please Click on this Link and follow through with customizing your comments and then sending them forward to be included.

Many of those who would prefer to see the regulations for the land-grab of the Obama Administration, expanding the definition for what waters the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers could regulate, are going to be pouring in their comments on how the new rules don’t go far enough. Farm Bureau members need to make it clear that we support clean water and clear rules, capable of being understood and easily identified. We can’t afford to lose private property through over-reaching federal control! You need to make your voice be heard through this public input process…

If you wish to review the new proposed federal plan, please use this link to reach the website with that information.

 

Important Reminder - Humboldt River Basin Meetings Planned – Jan. 15 & 16

Back in 2018, we called attention to the plans for workshops that the Nevada Division of Water Resources will be holding to share the newest information gathered on the Humboldt River Basin water modeling studies. These studies are being carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to use the data to set up models for what is taking place in three reaches of the Humboldt River and are going to be used in addressing the groundwater and Humboldt River water conflicts.

We want to remind you of the workshops that are scheduled and strongly encourage you to attend/participate:

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

9:30 a.m. – Lovelock City Hall (400 14th St) Lovelock, NV

2:00 p.m. – Humboldt County Courthouse – Room 201 (500 West 5th St) Winnemucca, NV

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

9:30 a.m. – Elko County Library (720 Court St) Elko, NV

 

2019 Nevada Cattlemen Update Series…Jan 7 – 11

 

Last week we located the information necessary to share the information for the 2019 Cattlemen Update Series of meetings that will be held across the state the week of January 7 – 11. Unfortunately, the initial information that we had to go on had some missing details. Thank you to one of our loyal readers for calling to our attention the need to add the Fallon meeting information. The information was updated and is improved for use here as a reminder for those who are making their plans to attend the sessions in their local area… More specifics on the program can be obtained from this website posting

 

 

The schedule for the meetings include:

  • Monday, January 7 – Reno, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Washoe County Cooperative Extension Office, 4955 Energy Way

(The meeting will also be video conferenced to Caliente, Eureka, Logandale and Lovelock Cooperative Extension Offices)

  • Monday, January 7 – Sierra Valley, CA 5:30 p.m. (dinner will be provided)

Sierra Valley Grange, 92203 Highway 70

  • Tuesday, January 8 – Wellington, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Smith Valley Community Hall, 2783 State Rt. 208

  • Tuesday January 8 – Fallon 5:30 p.m. (dinner provided)

Fallon Convention Center, 100 Campus Way.

  • Wednesday, January 9 – Ely, NV 5:30 p.m. (dinner will be provided)

Old St. Lawrence Hall, 504 Mill St.

  • Thursday, January 10 – Elko, NV 12:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided)

Great Basin College Solarium, 1500 College Parkway

  • Friday, January 11 – Winnemucca, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Humboldt County Cooperative Extension Office, Fairgrounds

 

New Year – New Congress

 

The 116 U.S. Congress is getting started and with the results of the 2018 elections,   Nevada citizens will need to begin the process of developing working relationships with the new team of representatives who will be working on behalf of their constituents.

While more details needs to be discovered… Here’s what we currently know for the contact information of the Nevada Congressional delegation

 

 

U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

204 Russell Senate Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

202-224-3542

U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen

(Washington DC office unknown at this writing)

202-224-6244

District Office                                                      District Office

333 Las Vegas Blvd. # 8016 400                            400 S. Virginia St # 902

Las Vegas, NV 89101-7075                                    Reno, NV 89501-2109

702-388-5030                                                      775-686-5750

U.S. Congresswoman Dina Titus – District 1

2464 Rayburn Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-5965

U.S. Congressman Mark Amodei – District 2

332 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-6155

U.S. Congresswoman Susie Lee – District 3

413 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-3252

U.S. Congressman Steve Horsford – District 4

313 Cannon Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

202-225-9894

Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition 14th Annual Weed Conference – Jan. 9 & 10

Last week’s newsletter highlighted the upcoming Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) 14th Annual Weed Conference in Ely, NV.The schedule includes a wide range of timely topics for those who are involved in responding with management/control of noxious and invasive weeds. The conference is scheduled for Jan. 9 and 10 at the Bristlecone Convention Center in Ely. Those in the area are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the meeting and for those who need credits from the Nevada Department of Agriculture for their pesticide credentials…be certain to check this out as well.

To qualify for the pre-conference rate, you need to take action before Jan. 4.

This link will take you to the pre-registration information you’ll need to get registered for the Weed Conference.

The Beginning Purposes For Farm Bureau – Our First 100 Years…

While Farm Bureau’s priorities have changed and evolved over the organization’s first 100 years, the county Farm Bureau grassroots structure has always been the foundation. It was county Farm Bureaus who were the initial beginning for Farm Bureau.

Extracting historic insights from “The Farm Bureau Through Three Decades,” authored by O.M. Kile in 1948, we’re able to trace the start to the original county Farm Bureaus. In 1914 Broome County Farm Bureau was formed for farmers to control their own affairs on local matters and were primarily focused on assisting the “county demonstrator” (the system that was to become cooperative extension agents) in bringing useful information to local farmers.

M.C. Burritt – vice-director of Extension of New York State is attributed for giving this as his definition for county Farm Bureaus in 1922…a definition that stuck and was considered the official designation in many states.

“A county farm bureau is an association of people interested in rural affairs, which has for it’s object the development in a county of the most profitable and permanent system of agriculture, the establishment of the community ideals, and the furtherance of the well-being, prosperity, and happiness of the rural people through cooperation with local, state and national agencies in the development with execution of a program of extension work in agriculture and home economics.”

We can specifically identify the original purpose of Farm Bureau in Nevada by reading the 1919 Legislative bill, AB 110 and learn the intentions of creating county farm bureaus for the purpose of local farmers directing cooperative extension “in order to aid in diffusing among the people of the State of Nevada useful and practical information on subjects relating to agriculture, home economics and rural welfare…”

The June 18th, 1920 meeting minutes of the Elko County Farm Bureau Board of Directors covered the decision for the organization to acquire silo forms to rent at the rate of $1.00 per day for the first 10 days, increasing to $2 per day each day after the first 10. Before adjourning the Board also voted to increase county agent C.A. Brennen’s annual salary to the regular rate of $2,400 per year.

Notes relating to the December 11, 1920 organizational meeting for the Humboldt County Farm Bureau highlighted the budget that was adopted of $ 5,650 and the report made by County Extension Agent Cecil Creel for the extension work to be carried out. (Thanks to J.E. White for her sharing these notes with Vickie Hellwinkel when she was conducting her research. J.E. White identified her father, Minor C. Eastman, as her father who was elected to serve as Humboldt County Farm Bureau President in 1923.)

The first state Farm Bureau was created in Missouri as a federation of county farm bureaus, March 24 and 25, 1915. Massachusetts and Vermont followed suit later that same year. Illinois came along in 1916 and New York was established in 1917. By the fall of 1918 at least nine states had formed state federations.

As we reported in last week’s article on this topic, Nevada joined the American Farm Bureau Federation in 1920 and was originally called, the “Nevada State Farm Bureau"

 

 

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Young Farmers & Ranchers Recap

It’s been quite the year Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R). Churchill County has added a YF&R chapter to their county, which already has an impressive membership total with over 20 members. A Collegiate program has also been established at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) with growing membership engagement as well. 

At the 99th Annual Nevada Farm Bureau Meeting YF&R was fortunate enough to have the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) YF&R Chair Russel Kohler. Russel spoke to YF&R at their breakout session to encourage them to become more active. He shared his story of growth in his state and how each and every YF&R member can be involved. He focused on delegation saying, “no one can do everything, we need to find strengths in each person and work together.” 

The annual YF&R Discussion Meet also took place at the 99th Annual Nevada Farm Bureau meeting with eight participants. Participants included: Blane Merkley, Hunter Drost, Gunnar Garms, Kathleen Wolter, Sarah Stallard, Dann Mathews, Bailey Brown, and Kari Brough. 

Discussion Meet questions are selected by the AFBF and distributed throughout the states. The winner from our state competition is then selected to represent us at the AFBF Annual Meeting held this year in New Orleans. 

It was a great discussion meet with the final four contestants being Blane Merkley, Dann Mathews, Sarah Stallard and Kari Brough. The final four battled it out and the results were: 

1st Place: Blane Merkley of Churchill County and the Collegiate YF&R President. 

2nd Place: Dann Mathews of Lincoln County and the Lincoln County President. 

3rd Place: Sarah Stallard of Clark County and the District 1 YF&R Committee representative 

4th Place: Kari Brough of Elko County and the District 2 YF&R Committee representative 

“The Discussion Meet is a great time to come together with other individuals to discuss important issues and figure out new solutions we can use to increase engagement,” said Blane Merkley. 

We look forward to seeing Blane Merkley compete in the AFBF discussion meet this January in New Orleans and wish him all the best. 

Each year YF&R also collects food donations for people in need throughout the state as part of the Harvest for All campaign. This year the state YF&R committee decided to award a Golden Pitch Fork to the county who collected the most food. The winner of the Golden Pitch Fork was Elko County with a total of 15 lbs. of food collected in addition to a monetary donation of $280. The Golden Pitch fork will be awarded again next year to the county with the greatest Harvest for all Contributions. 

YF&R hopes to double participation in the coming year as we go into our 100th year celebration.

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Weekly Newsletter For The Week Of December 31, 2018

Nevada Farm Bureau Newsletter For The Week Of December 31, 2018

Don’t Miss The 2019 Nevada Cattlemen Update Series…Jan 7 – 11

 

We almost missed this opportunity to remind you of the 2019 Cattlemen Update Series of meetings that will be held across the state the week of January 7 – 11. More specifics on the program can be obtained from this website posting Click Here

 

The schedule for the meetings include:

  • Monday, January 7 – Reno, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Washoe County Cooperative Extension Office, 4955 Energy Way

(The meeting will also be video conferenced to Caliente, Eureka, Logandale and Lovelock Cooperative Extension Offices)

  • Monday, January 7 – Sierra Valley, CA 5:30 p.m. (dinner will be provided)

Sierra Valley Grange, 92203 Highway 70

  • Tuesday, January 8 – Wellington, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Smith Valley Community Hall, 2783 State Rt. 208

  • Tuesday January 8- Fallon 5:30 p.m. (dinner provided) 

Fallon Convention Center, 100 Campus Way. 

  • Wednesday, January 9 – Ely, NV 5:30 p.m. (dinner will be provided)

Old St. Lawrence Hall, 504 Mill St.

  • Thursday, January 10 – Elko, NV 12:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided)

Great Basin College Solarium, 1500 College Parkway

  • Friday, January 11 – Winnemucca, NV 10 a.m. (lunch will be provided)

Humboldt County Cooperative Extension Office, Fairgrounds

Public Comments For Proposed Expansion Of Navy Training Due Feb. 14, 2019

 

Several weeks ago the U.S. Navy held public meetings across Northern Nevada to cover details for the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that they released in November. The plan outlines the Navy’s preferred action to keep the testing areas that they now have and expand into new areas for enhancing their training capabilities. The public input process allows for comments to be submitted. Their website provides a portal for obtaining the full EIS as well as sharing input… If you haven’t already done so, visit the website by Clicking Here 

Public comment has been extended to February 14, 2019.

Nevada Farm Bureau policy calls for compensation for property for adverse economic impacts to farmers/ranchers of new and existing military activities, reservations or restricted areas.

Farm Bureau policy further states -- “In cases where grazing allotment closure is required, compensation to grazing allotment owners should be required and should take into account the value of the feed provided for that allotment (within the seasonal context of how that allotment fits into the ranch’s operations); the value of the water rights on the allotment (with the full value of the lost or change in status of the water right); the value of any and all range improvements and the consequences of the economic conditions for the ranching operation by the loss of the component provided by the grazing allotment. Compensated water rights should be retired.”

The Navy’s EIS indicates that their planned expansion could impact up to 17 Bureau of Land Management (BLM) grazing allotments and also a permit with the Bureau of Reclamation. Tracing the details of the Preferred Alternative (III) the closure of lands could affect 356,400 acres of grazing lands and somewhere between 7,920 to 10,992 Animal Unit Months (AUMs).

Comments on this level of impact are certainly warranted as are the thoughts that Farm Bureau policy recommends for just compensation. An example of possible input is offered here,Nevada Farm Bureau’s Draft Comments, We welcome feedback and input to the Draft Comments. Share your thoughts with an email to doug@nvfb.org.

Accomplishing this objective will likely need to be more political than National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) oriented… As the Navy goes through the motions of their NEPA process the boxes get checked that they did the “analysis” that they are required to carry out…then it will be moved into the hierarchy of the Navy to make the “official” determination before heading off to Congress for the legislative requirement for “withdrawal” of the federally-managed lands.

In the Navy’s EIS, several observations are made to their view of what they are obligated (or not) to do… “Based on the analysis in the Draft EIS, not mitigation measures are proposed for livestock grazing. Though not a NEPA mitigation measure, the Navy acknowledges that it has the authority under the Taylor

Grazing Act of 1934, to make payments to federal grazing permit holders for losses suffered as a result of the withdrawal or other use of former federal grazing lands for war or national defense.”

Having said that they don’t think NEPA requires compensation and acknowledging that they could make payments, the Draft EIS covers for methods that might be available for making the calculations for valuing lost AUMs.

One method (Replacement cost for forage) puts the value per AUM in the area about $ 9.90. A second method (Cow-Calf costs & return budget) determines the value per AUM to be about $38. A third method (the contribution of the federal grazing permit to the market value of the ranch property as a whole) gives a range of $100 to $350 per AUM. A fourth method (Production function to valuation) is the method identified as the Navy’s view for what should be used and puts the value at $56.83 per AUM.

Again, in reference to the outline for appropriate compensation and consideration of the context for how closed grazing allotments/lost AUMs can impact the overall economic situation for a ranching operation, Farm Bureau policy would stress that the Navy’s choice for considering the valuation method that results in a value of $56.83 per AUM is wrong. Such a statement would be appropriate to be shared in public comment. The valuation system which evaluates the contribution of the federal grazing permit to the market value of the ranch property as a whole should be the method used, based on the direction of Farm Bureau policy.

After the start of the 116 Session of Congress in January, work will be necessary to enlist the support of Nevada’s new Congressional delegation in winning support for appropriate funding to resolve the lost grazing allotments as well as associated private property that is connected.

President Trump Issues Executive Order For Federal Land Managers To Deal With Fuel Loads That Are At The Heart Of Massive Wildfires

On December 21, President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order, promoting active management of America’s forest, rangelands and other federal lands to improve conditions and reduce wildfire risk. The language of this Executive Order can be reviewed by Clicking Here

The Executive Order directs both the Secretary of Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to move forward in treating lands administered by their respective agencies to reduce fuel loads. As important as this statement of direction is, coming from the President, to accomplish these objectives the incoming Secretary of Interior and Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture will need to put in motion the steps to press for the level of on-the-ground management that has been lacking.

Coming off this past summer’s massive wildfire season, Nevada Farm Bureau policy has been given greater priority for responding to fire and fuels management. Concepts approved of by Nevada Farm Bureau voting delegates have also been sent forward for consideration by the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) voting delegates.This Link shares the current Nevada Farm Bureau fire-related policy.

More On Water Bills Heading Into The 2019 Legislature…

 

Over the past couple of weeks we have been previewing legislation that has been introduced by the State Engineer for consideration in the 2019 Legislature. This week, attention turns to AB 62. 

The proposed language of AB 62 works to amend state law covering extensions for the completion of a construction project to put water to beneficial use. The details of the proposed changes fall mostly into Section 2 of the legislation and seeks to amend NRS 533.390.

Nevada Farm Bureau policy states… “We ask that all municipal applications or permit holders be held to the same standard as other entities.” The language of the proposed legislation seems to provide for different treatment for municipal water projects.

We welcome our readers to share their perspective on the interpretation that we’re having, for this bill (AB 62) and any of the others we’ve covered so far (AB 30 ) and (AB 51). 

 

Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition 14th Annual Weed Conference – Jan. 9 & 10

The Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) is putting the final touches to the program for the 14th Annual Weed Conference in Ely, NV. The schedule includes a wide range of timely topics for those who are involved in responding with management/control of noxious and invasive weeds. The conference is scheduled for Jan. 9 and 10 at the Bristlecone Convention Center in Ely.

To qualify for the pre-conference rate, you need to take action before Jan. 4. This Link will take you to the pre-registration information you’ll need to get registered for the Weed Conference.

 

More On Farm Bureau’s First 100 Years…

 

Last week’s newsletter began the story of Farm Bureau’s beginning, at the national level with the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) and the 1919 legislation which launched Farm Bureau in Nevada. In the process of bringing AFBF into its beginning, James Raley Howard of Iowa was elected to serve as the organization’s first President. In his book, “The Farm Bureau Through Three Decades” O.M. Kile reported that Howard served over a three-year tenure 1920-1922. The second President of AFBF

was Oscar. E. Bradfute who served 1923-1925. Bradfute was from Ohio and had served as the acting chair during the 1919 meeting in the LaSalle Hotel when the AFBF was formed.

Preparing information for Nevada Farm Bureau’s 75th Anniversary, Victoria Hellwinkel of Gardnerville, NV put together an extensive outline of the state Farm Bureau. In this research, Assemblyman C.C. Tidd of Smith, NV was given credit for the organization’s first President for being the sponsor of AB 110 that created Farm Bureau in the state during the 1919 Nevada Legislature. Because Tidd was from Lyon County, his first steps were to organize his county as being the first county Farm Bureau in Nevada

Nevada Farm Bureau became a member of the AFBF in 1920 and E.C. Riddell of Elko County became President of the state organization. Riddle served as Nevada Farm Bureau President until W.A. Hardy took over in 1923. Vickie’s research doesn’t indicate which county that W.A. Hardy came from, but recent research suggest that he was from the Fernley, NV area.

In 1925, J.D. Yeager was selected as President of Nevada Farm Bureau and served to 1934. Yeager was from Lyon County.

At the AFBF level, Sam H. Thompson of Quincy, IL was selected as President in 1926 and served until 1931.

Opening the first AFBF office in Washington, D.C. after the March 1920 Farm Bureau meeting, Stuart Truelsen, author of “Forward Farm Bureau” a book of the first 90 years of Farm Bureau, recounted early legislative information that Kile wrote in his “The Farm Bureau Through Three Decades.”

Identified as a foundation to the organization’s eventual success in lobbying on behalf of farmer/rancher families, the initial success came with the work in Congress to put together in the 1920ies the “Farm Bloc,” national lawmakers who worked together in support of positive agricultural legislation. Truelsen’s book notes, “The Farm Bloc was formed on May 9, 1921 when a bipartisan group of Senators from the Midwest and South met in Farm Bureau’s office.” The original group of a dozen Senators grew to 22 and there were 30 members from the U.S. House of Representatives.

Interesting County Farm Bureau meeting minutes and history indicate that Elko County Farm Bureau was also up and running with a functioning Board of Directors in June of 1920 and Humboldt County Farm Bureau held their formation meeting in August of the same year. The June 1920 Elko County Farm Bureau Board minutes cover the organization’s activities of acquiring “silo forms” which they planned to rent out.

 

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NDA lab detects Phytoplasma Witch’s Broom: A devastating bacterial disease that can affect hemp crops in Nevada

By Shouhua Wang, Ph.D., Nevada Department of Agriculture Plant Pathologist

A healthy hemp plant that has green and fully developed leaves.

Now in its third year, the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) has registered more than 100 hemp operations throughout the state, many of them researching the viability and durability of different varietals in Nevada’s climates.

In the 2018 growing season, the NDA Plant Pathology Lab detected a phytoplasma bacterium causing witches’ broom disease on hemp crops in several production areas. The disease seems to be primarily affecting “Cherry Wine” and “Berry Blossom” varieties, and it has affected these strains severely enough that crop harvest value has been negatively impacted.

 A diseased hemp plant that is much smaller than the healthy plant and has severe yellowing and clustered Accredited plant pathology lab is first in the U.S. to identify the pathogen

This is the first confirmed identification of the phytoplasma pathogen on cannabis crops in the United States. Hemp growers should pay attention to this type of disease by checking plants periodically for symptoms and taking steps to prevent its spread to other plants.

Bacteria are microscopic single-celled organisms. Most bacteria cause soft rot, fire blight, wilt or root rot on plants. Phytoplasmas are different from most bacterium and typically cause witches’ broom, systemic yellowing, stunting, chronic decline and abnormal growth. Unfortunately, phytoplasmas cause untreatable damage, so it’s important for hemp growers to take preventative steps.

Hemp is prone to phytoplasma infection, and once infected, plants exhibit severe witches’ broom symptoms, as is sometimes seen on alfalfa. Witches’ broom symptoms typically resemble crowded growth of leaves on single branches, creating a cluster where the leaves are small, yellowish and not fully developed. Early infected plants may be severely stunted or killed by the bacteria. While plants infected later may not die during the season, symptomatic plants are useless for harvest. In the middle or late season, some plants may show clusters of witches’ broom symptoms on certain branches while the rest of plant looks normal, which suggests only a portion of the plant is infected.

Preventing phytoplasma diseases

Because phytoplasma bacterium are generally not treatable, the best way to manage this disease is through prevention. Check for healthy plant stock with no signs of disease, especially on “Cherry Wine” and “Berry Blossom” varieties. Seeds should come from sources free of phytoplasma witches’ broom during seed production.

If the disease does occur in a field, the best strategy is to remove all symptomatic plants as early as possible, and monitor for potential insect vectors such as leafhoppers, planthoppers and psyllids. These insects can acquire phytoplasma from diseased plants and transmit it from plant to plant. Control of insect vectors can minimize the spread of the disease but will not cure or reverse existing phytoplasma infection.

The NDA Plant Pathology program provides diagnostic services to growers for any plant disease problems. If phytoplasma witches’ broom is suspected on a hemp plant, submit samples to the NDA Plant Pathology Lab. For sample submission guidelines and more information about plant pathology, visit http://agri.nv.gov/plant_pathology.

 

Photo captions

  • First Picture – A healthy hemp plant that has green and fully developed leaves.
  • Second Picture – A diseased hemp plant that is much smaller than the healthy plant and has severe yellowing and clustered leaves.
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Farm Bill Signing Secures Benefits for All Americans

The following may be attributed to American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall:

“The Agriculture Improvement Act—H.R. 2—is now law. Enactment means risk management tools, foreign market development and environmental stewardship programs continue to be available, and on terms that reflect a much tougher farm economy than the one we faced when the last farm bill became law.

“The farm bill helps to ensure the food security and economic security of our nation. Directly or indirectly, it benefits everyone in towns large and small. This farm bill:

  •  Brings another five years of certainty to farm and ranch families
  • Upholds fiscal responsibility by being budget neutral;
  • Improves risk management programs;
  •  Protects crop insurance;
  • Funds much-needed trade development;
  • Invests in the future with funding for ag research and beginning farmer programs; and
  • Continues nutrition assistance (three-quarters of total farm bill funding) for lower-income Americans.

“We are grateful to President Trump for his support. We also thank Chairmen Roberts and Conaway and Ranking Members Stabenow and Peterson for producing legislation that passed with strong, bi-partisan support. We look forward to working with Agriculture Secretary Perdue as he and his team at USDA implement this law and put new program provisions in place quickly.”

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Weekly Newsletter For The Week Of December 24, 2018

Nevada Farm Bureau Newsletter For The Week Of December 24, 2018

Your feedback and input to the new system for distributing the weekly Grassroots Newsletter would be greatly appreciated. We hope that you’ve been able to track the links that have been provided to get you to the Nevada Farm Bureau website page where the weekly issue of the newsletter is provided. We also hope that the information provided and the format for this presentation is something that you find useful/easy to read. Please share your thoughts and ideas by dropping an email to doug@nvfb.org.

Highlighted links in red will provide more information on the subject once you click on them.  

More Details On Proposed Nevada Water Law Changes

In the last issue of This Newsletter we highlighted the background and details for one of the pre-filed pieces of legislation that lawmakers will be dealing with in 2019 – AB 30 AB 30 deals with legislating a framework for 3M plans (management, monitoring and mitigation) for water, which basically seeks to do a workaround to the state’s prior appropriations doctrine of law. If the State Engineer so decides, senior water right owners might not have the water they should have because of junior water right applications being granted along with mitigation to make up for the loss.

Another proposed legislative measure that the State Engineer’s office is bringing forward is AB 51. AB 51 is legislation that seeks to establish a framework for “Conjunctive Management” of water sources.

In the 2018 Nevada Legislature, the State Engineer’s office was successful in inserting the language into state law, that it is the intention of the Nevada Legislature to manage water in a conjunctive manner. This was accomplished through SB 47. Beyond combining water management for the sections of state law dealing with surface water and ground water, through this stated “intention,” no other details provided specifics on what that meant.

The proposed regulations by the State Engineer for the Humboldt River system provided the first glimpse of what might be intended. This concept proposed to avoid curtailment of interference by junior water right owners (those pumping groundwater in the vicinity of the Humboldt River) by paying a fee to be used to reimburse the lost water that surface water right owners (who are more senior) are incurring.

Nevada Farm Bureau went on record as not supporting this regulatory proposal, which is now back in some status of rewrite. The argument that Farm Bureau made in opposing the proposal was that the State Engineer didn’t have the authority to ignore the prior appropriations doctrine and not carry out the curtailments for impacts to water right owners by arbitrary regulations to use cash payments as the offset. AB 51 basically is written to cover the shortfall of legislated authority and have the state law changed to give the authority that wasn’t there.

In and of itself, the idea that “Conjunctive Management” should have something more by way of a framework than a passing statement of intent, but post-dating such specific authority to cover the predetermined plan for the regulation that the State Engineer thought was a solution isn’t probably the best way to approach things. What are your thoughts or ideas? Please join the conversation and share these views with doug@nvfb.org.

Humboldt River Basin Meetings Planned – Jan. 15 & 16

In last week’s newsletter, we also reported the updated plans for workshops that the Nevada Division of Water Resources will be holding to share the newest information gathered on the Humboldt River Basin water modeling studies, which are being carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Desert Research Institute (DRI). These studies are developing the data for what is taking place in three reaches of the Humboldt River and are going to be used in addressing the groundwater and Humboldt River water conflicts. The information presented during the workshops will be dealing with further research that has been done and the findings over the past year.

Those impacted by the plans that the State Engineer’s office is working to implement, using the discovered science of the water modeling studies, need to make every effort to attend these critical workshops:

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

9:30 a.m. – Lovelock City Hall (400 14th St) Lovelock, NV

2:00 p.m. – Humboldt County Courthouse – Room 201 (500 West 5th St) Winnemucca, NV

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

9:30 a.m. – Elko County Library (720 Court St) Elko, NV

Federal Regulation For Livestock Hauling Continues The ELD Exemption For Foreseeable Future

The announcement has come from Washington, D.C. on the website for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) that “Transporters of livestock and insects are not required to have an Electronic Logging Device (ELD). The statutory exemption will remain in place until further notice. Drivers do not need to carry any documentation regarding this exemption.”

This isn’t a new development, but does serve to clarify where things stand. It intended to cover the potential shutdown of the U.S. Government, if another Continuing Resolution (CR) is achieved when the current funding band aid expires on December 21.

Both the House and Senate have passed appropriations bills with ELD prohibition language for the next fiscal year.

American Farm Bureau Federation Lobbyists Recognized For Their Work In Representing Farm Bureau Policy

Three members of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s (AFBF) lobbying team have been identified by the publication The Hill as being tops in their field as association lobbyists. Congratulations to Andrew Walmsley, R.J. Karney and Scott Bennett for the recognition given.

Farm Bureau members benefit from the full-time lobbying efforts the organization offers, strengthened by the engagement that Farm Bureau members contribute in their contacts with elected representatives at the state and national level.

The Road To Becoming 100…

In a few weeks a group of Farm Bureau members from Nevada will be traveling to participate in the 2019 American Farm Bureau Federation’s (AFBF) Annual Meeting. Along with the usual business of determining future public policy positions, information conferences on a wide range of topics, those attending this year’s annual meeting will be celebrating the Farm Bureau history of 100 years. Those type of “round number” milestones are fairly significant events and will be marked by taking into account the noteworthy accomplishments of the past, but also launching the organization into the future.

In his account of “The Farm Bureau Through Three Decades”, Orville Merton Kile shared the history of Farm Bureau that went back as far as the pre-Farm Bureau days and the formation of county Farm Bureaus (Broome County in New York and Pettis County in Missouri). These organizations, which were formed in 1912 and 1913 were first created to bring county extension agents to their respective communities, assisting local farmers with education and information provided by Land Grant University research. These early county Farm Bureaus pre-dated the passage of the Smith-Lever Act by Congress on May 8, 1914.

From the formation of county Farm Bureaus, state Farm Bureaus evolved in several states and Feb. 12-13, 1919, representatives from 12 states gathered in Ithaca, NY to consider the idea of forming a national organization. These first dozen states included Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont and West Virginia. The outcome of this initial meeting and further developments lead to the plan for a November 12 and 13, 1919 meeting in Chicago to move forward with the organization of a national Farm Bureau. This gathering occurred in the Red Room of the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago with about 500 delegates and visitors attending.

Meanwhile in Nevada… On February 25, 1919 a bill (AB 110) was introduced in the 29th Session of the Nevada Legislature, by Assemblyman Care C. Tidd of Smith, Nevada. The purpose of the bill was to provide for cooperative agricultural and home economics – extension – work in several counties in accordance with the Smith-Lever Act and provide for the organization of County Farm Bureaus.

Following formation of an authorized county Farm Bureau, the bill directed that it would become recognized as the “official body within said county for carrying on extension work in agriculture and home economics in cooperation…”

AB 110 passed the Nevada Assembly on a 22 to 0 vote on March 13, 1919 and passed the Nevada Senate on March 14, 1919 on an 11 – 0 vote.

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Meet Your Young Farmers and Ranchers State Committee!

Meet your Young Farmers and Ranchers State Committee!

Interested in joining the Nevada Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) program? YF&R is a committee designed for young individuals who are both agriculture producers and enthusiasts between the ages of 18 and 35 years old.

We are happy to announce the State YF&R Committee and encourage you to reach out if interested in joining.

 

Ashley Bunker- YF&R Committee Chair

Ashley is a part of a family operation that involves Corriente roping steers. She has been involved in the Clark County Young Farmers and Ranchers since 2011. She enjoys helping local FFA chapters and school with the Women's Leadership Committee. Ashley has served as the Young Farmers and Ranchers Chair on the State Committee for one year. In her term the committee has grown to collect more sponsors and started a fundraiser selling YF&R hats. She has three beautiful children and loves creating crafts for them and other families.

 

 

 

Email: ashlylasater@gmail.com

Sarah Stallard- District 1

Sarah Stallard is a 7th generation farmer at Las Vegas Livestock, a feeder finisher operation where she manages 5,000 pigs along with 300 laying hens, it is also one of the largest food scrap feeding operations in the U.S. Sarah graduated from Colorado State university with a Masters in Animal Science and after moving to Nevada and is starting to get active in her local Farm Bureau as Clark County YF&R chair. She is also involved in Pork Check off serving as Nevada's state delegate, sitting on the animal welfare committee, and as an OMS speaker.

 

 

 

 

 

Email:Sarah@combsbrothersllc.com

Kari Brough- District 2

Born and Raised on a dry farm in northern Utah her family raised mostly barley, alfalfa, and hard red winter wheat on their fifth-generation farm just outside of bear river city. In 2011 Kari and Jordan got married after meeting at Utah State University. She graduated from Utah State University in 2013 with a Bachelor of Science in agriculture with an emphasis in aviation. Jordan and Kari moved back to Brough Ranch in 2015 and started the 4th generation of Brough’s to help run their family ranch. 

Kari and Jordan have 2 beautiful children Chester (3) Evalyn (1) who work right besides them on the ranch and keep them busy. 

Kari has many job titles but to sum it all up she is a stay at home ranch mom, which means she does a little bit of everything. Her biggest input on the ranch is with the sales of American Kobe Beef, this includes everything from photography to online sales and farmers markets. 

Kari is the YF&R president for Elko county and has been a chair member of the State committee for 4 years. Her favorite part is getting to see the great things young farmers and ranchers are doing with their own ranches. She looks forward to another great year and is excited to see how the state will move forward.  

Email: kari.c.brough@gmail.com

Monica Washburn-Schroeder- District 3

Monica Washburn-Schroeder is a 6th generation farmer and rancher in Churchill County.  Her family runs a 350 head cow/calf herd and farm over 800 acres of alfalfa and other rotational forage crops. She grew up working cows with her dad and farming with her grandma, grandpa and mom. She is currently the secretary for Churchill County’s Farm bureau and the Young Farmers and Ranchers Group. She is also a 4H livestock club leader and on the county’s livestock show board committee. Though she doesn't get to devote all of her time farming and ranching just yet, she has tried to keep close to the industry working jobs as a vet supply store manager, a wild land firefighter and currently at Stanislaus Farm Supply.

 

Email: monica.jeanine@yahoo.com

 

Blane Merkley- Collegiate YF&R

Blane Merkley is currently serving on the Nevada State YF&R Committee and as the Collegiate YF&R President at the University of Nevada, Reno Chapter. He is a founding member of the Collegiate YF&R chapter. He is representing Nevada this year at the American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting while competing in the discussion meet in New Orleans. He is from Churchill County, but currently living in Reno for College. Blane is a senior in college pursing a bachelor’s degree in agriculture science and Business Administration.

Email: Blanem27@gmail.com

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99th Annual Nevada Farm Bureau Meeting

99 years and going strong. We are happy to have celebrated our 99thAnnual Nevada Farm Bureau Meeting November 29ththrough December 1stat the Santa Fe Station in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Each year the annual meeting is a time for policy development, informational sessions and most importantly people from around the state coming together to strengthen the agriculture community.

Policy development is an important part of the annual meeting. The policy development process includes amending, deleting and adding new policies to not only be used in lobbying efforts in our own state, but on the national level as well.

Informational sessions included:

  • Maggie Orr spoke on the Resources Needs Assessment Project. Orr is the President of the Nevada Association of Conservation Districts and informed people on updates about the project and ways for people to get involved.
  • Suzanna Stone talked about indoor agriculture. Stone is Vice President of Horticulture at Urban Seed Incorporated where they are providing a new and initiative way to grow food from seed to table.
  • Jennifer Ott spoke on Nevada’s Industrial Hemp Production. Ott is the Nevada Department of Agriculture Plant Industry Division Administrator and provided insight on the industrial hemp protocol for the state of Nevada.
  • Therese Ure spoke on Protecting Your Water Rights and Information You Need to Know. Ure is water rights lawyer for Schroeder Law Offices. Ure provided attendees with information to protect their water rights, and information they could use in the future for protecting their water rights.
  • Randy Dwyer spoke on Farm Bureau grassroots Advocacy. Dwyer is the Director of Grassroots Program Development for the American Farm Bureau Federation. With next year a legislative year Dwyer provided information for members to become involved and have their voice heard on legislative issues.

In addition to the information conferences and policy development it is also a time for Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) and the Women’s Leadership Committee to have their annual meeting as well.

YF&R was pleased to have Russel Kohler the Chair of the American Farm Bureau YF&R committee speak on getting the younger generation involved. The annual Discussion Meet also took place, which was great to see so many people engaged in hot topics facing agriculture.  Blane Merkley the Collegiate YF&R President was the 1stplace winner of the Discussion Meet.

Women’s Leadership also held their annual Silent Auction raising a total of $846. The annual quilt raffle was also a huge success bringing in a total of $1,359.25. Moving forward this year Women’s leadership hopes to participate in schools on Ag Day and other agriculture literacy programs.

The Nevada Farm Bureau President and Vice President are annually elected positions and we are happy to announce President Bevan Lister and Vice President Darrell Pursel won reelection.

Other board positions up for reelection included Women’s Leadership Committee Chair and Vice Chair as well as District 2 Director. Cindy Hardy Women’s Leadership Committee Chair and Vice Chair Marlene Shier and District 2 Director Craig Shier all won reelection.

 We look forward to the coming year and the countdown to the 100thyear celebration has official begun.

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Support the Nevada Farm Bureau Federation

Nevada Farm Bureau Federation

2165 Green Vista Dr., Suite 205
Sparks, Nevada 89431

Phone: 775-674-4000
Fax: 775-674-4004

nvfarmbureau@nvfb.org